DPopTart
intothebeautifulnew:

Joan Crawford; 1920s.

intothebeautifulnew:

Joan Crawford; 1920s.

Horror stories about Muslim misogyny have long been used by western patriarchs to justify imperialism abroad and sexism at home. The Guardian’s Katharine Viner reminds us about Lord Cromer, the British consul general in Egypt from 1883. Cromer believed the Egyptians were morally and culturally inferior in their treatment of women and that they should be “persuaded or forced” to become “civilised” by disposing of the veil.

"And what did this forward-thinking, feminist-sounding veil-burner do when he got home to Britain?" asks Viner. "He founded and presided over the Men’s League for Opposing Women’s Suffrage, which tried, by any means possible, to stop women getting the vote. Colonial patriarchs like Cromer … wanted merely to replace eastern misogyny with western misogyny." More than a century later, the same logic is used to imply that misogyny only matters when it isn’t being done by white men.

andreafluff:

instadayum:

kamikaze95:

nowyoukno:

Remember IT IS NOT A WOMAN’S RESPONSIBILITY TO PREVENT RAPE. In the world we live in, however, women should be empowered with any tools in order to protect themselves. Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

:-))

i think the best but also saddest thing about this is that MEN created this product to protect women from MEN

Preach.

andreafluff:

instadayum:

kamikaze95:

nowyoukno:

Remember IT IS NOT A WOMAN’S RESPONSIBILITY TO PREVENT RAPE. In the world we live in, however, women should be empowered with any tools in order to protect themselves. Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

:-))

i think the best but also saddest thing about this is that MEN created this product to protect women from MEN

Preach.

lesbeehive:

Les Beehive – Beyoncé by Pierre Debusschere for CR Fashion Book #5
Mod

Mod

If you want to think about sexual sadism as 'just about sex' in a book which shows a sophisticated, sadistic, groomer who goes after a vulnerable young girl and then basically seduces her into violence, which is what the book is about, and I do agree [that] the film will do very well, I’m sure, because it has a massive PR machine behind it. But what we’re talking about is not so much being judgmental, there’s cultural criticism here: What does it mean to live in a society where 1 in 4 women are sexually assaulted and we have a book that eroticizes violence against women and thus renders that violence invisible? …

Let’s look at what [women] are enchanted by: The first thing is that Christian Grey is portrayed as super-rich. I doubt that Anastasia, the woman in it who’s 21 but sounds like a 14 year old, would be so taken over, bowled over by him if he was living on welfare in a council flat eating cereal for dinner. The fact that he’s wealthy, he showers her with luxuries, that she is so naïve and vulnerable - she doesn’t even know what an orgasm is. She is completely the type of female that these sadistic men go after: they groom them, they can smell them a mile off. And I’m saying, it’s not an issue of, ‘If you don’t like it, don’t go and see it!’ The issue is the kind of violence that images basically legitimize and create against a minority oppressed group and that’s exactly what women are given the level of violence against them today.

What is fantasy? We don’t have a separate brain for fantasy and a separate brain for reality just as we don’t have a separate body for fantasy or reality. When you read media images and you basically internalize those images they construct your worldview. We have known that in media studies for 40 years: that the images you consume have a profound effect on the way you perceive the world, the way you perceive yourself, the way you perceive your gender, and the way you perceive sexuality.

People have wanted to see images of violence against oppressed groups ever since we’ve developed media images, it doesn’t make it okay. What we have to do is put the book in the context of the real world [and] … it normalizes it and condones it, it does.

I know that from years and years of research, empirical research into how media affects people. I’m not just making this up as I go along, I have been studying media for 25 years. We know without a doubt. If media did not affect people why would we have a multi-billion dollar a year advertising industry? If you think images have no effect then you tell me why businesses are pouring billions of dollars into advertisements. It’s because they sell products. If you can sell products through images you can also sell ideologies, worldviews, norms and values through images.

The Great Kate (The Philadelphia Story, 1941)

barbarastanwyck:

paulettesgoddard asked Katharine Hepburn

Favorite film: The Philadelphia Story (1941)

screengoddess:

Merle Oberon, photo by Hurrell

screengoddess:

Merle Oberon, photo by Hurrell